Saturday, May 23, 2020

A Dystopian Society Is An Imbalance Between The Government...

Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany Luigi Zavala Ms. Underhill 6 HELA 21 November 2016 Thesis Statement: A dystopian society is an imbalance between the government and the people and how their choices affect the society in a bad way; Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Germany is a very good example of a dystopian society. By analyzing Nazi Germany and Hitler’s tyranny, one can notice Adolf’s changes in Germany, his impacts on people, and how the genres of literature can be taught through dystopia. Outline Introductory Paragraph with thesis Changes Adolf Hitler made Took over the government Started World War II Castigated Jews Impacts on the people Followed by Germans Conquered many countries Killed millions Genres of literature as educational tools Novel Autobiography Historical nonfiction Closing Dystopian societies are in the real world today and have been before. Many of them can vary in severity but all of them are terrible. A dystopian society is an imbalance between the government and the people and how their choices affect the society in a bad way; Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Germany is a very good example of a dystopian society. By analyzing Nazi Germany and Hitler’s tyranny, one can notice Adolf’s changes in Germany, his impacts on people, and how the genres of literature can be taught through dystopia. Hitler took over Germany’s government, and he had changed Germany very dramatically in bad and good ways. Because the Nazi party was one of the biggestShow MoreRelatedBrave New World By Aldous Huxley1778 Words   |  8 Pagesconsidered of lesser value to society than those who spend their time consuming. On the Savage Reservation, John’s mother Linda teaches him to read, making them the only two literate members of this society. John is ridiculed and even abused by his peers for having this skill, but in his eyes he is superior to them. The conditioning to steer oneself away from intellectual pursuits is a tool used by the leaders of this â€Å"utopian† society to further separate the common people from â€Å"the experts†. This conceptRead MoreThe Rise And Fall Of Communism1843 Words   |  8 PagesThis quote is one of the most famous political slogans excerpted from the book Communist Manifesto, which was written by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. It de monstrates Marx’s opinion on social classism and how he is against it by stating the imbalance between the working class and the ruling class. The quote ends with a rallying cry and call for the unity of all workers to rebel and demand for their own rights. The book Communist Manifesto is based on the idea of socialist theory. According to theRead MoreThe Social Structures Of A Destroyed World Essay2212 Words   |  9 Pagesway to cope and survive the destruction of their norm. In the event of total destruction, people are known to act differently because of fear and confusion. The psychology of human behavior switches from empathic to aggressive. Because human share the trait of fear, they are triggered to react erratically as a way to adjust to the situation. In this case, the situation being the post-apocalypse, everyday society will not react the same way in a post-apocalyptic world as they would in normalcy. In additionRead MoreSexuality in Literature Essay2653 Words   |  11 Pagesand is male and female sexuality really distinguishable. People have always been having sex; for reproduction and for pleasure. Even though it is a women’s and a man’s rightful claim to this intercourse women tend to feel as if sexuality is against them. This would also be contingent on the type on society one lives in. In some societies the mere topic of sex is tabooed and the subject is not confronted with clarity, meanwhile in other societies it is encoura ged, praised, and advocated to speak aboutRead More Human Rights Violations of Chinas One Child Policy Essay4302 Words   |  18 PagesAbstract The purpose of this research is to highlight to what extent government policy has violated the human rights of women in China. Government policy is important to the organization of countries. Government policies work to aid in political, economic, and social issues that can become detrimental to the function of a country. Flourishing government policies prove to be efficient and effective when implementation is deemed successful. The One Child Policy proved to be successful in reducingRead MoreOne Significant Change That Has Occurred in the World Between 1900 and 2005. 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Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Othello and the Theme of Revenge Essay example - 941 Words

Othello and the Theme of Revenge â€Å"Killing myself, to die upon a kiss†. These are Othello’s last words, as he commits suicide and dies next to his wife. After ironically killing her himself at the end of Act 5. Othello was led to do this by the manipulative Iago. He was just another victim of his revengeful scheme. The play was written in 1608 a time when the Ottoman Empire was at war with the Venetians. Othello is a tragedy because of the deception and betrayal of Iago which causes many people to die. During the times of Shakespeare, racism was a well known. I believe Shakespeare wanted to explore this as one of his main themes in the play, he did this mostly through Iago’s character, he racially†¦show more content†¦Ã¢â‚¬Å"call up her father, rouse him, make after him†. this suggests that Iago is a mean and crude person for wanting to do something like this. The play seems to evolve around Iago in these early stages in the play. Even when Iago speaks to Brabantio, the ton e and the words he uses to describe Othello â€Å"Beast with two backs† are very crude and can be very disgusting to listen to. White men were seen as trustworthy, respected people and arrogant, like Iago for example. He is trusted to be telling the truth as what ever he tells Brabantio and Rodrigo, they both believe, showing that Iago was by others as a trust worthy person. However Black men during the times of Shakespeare were abused and seen as unwanted people among their white environment. They were easily mislead, and some were even unaware of the racial abuse only they were suffering and not anyone else. Most are very gullible like Othello. Othello is the only black man in a white society this gives the clue of the theme racism, being explored by Shakespeare. Othello is racially abused by other character, especially Iago. â€Å"I hate the Moor†. this is a racist comment made by Iago, who seems to dislike Othello very dearly. Although we are never quite told as to why he hates so much. We are only given clues for his rage with Othello. For exampleShow MoreRelatedExamples of Shakepearian Revenge Tragedey in Othello and tragic Comedy in The Tempest1681 Words   |  7 PagesA revenge play or revenge tragedy is a form of tragedy which was extremely popular in the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras. One of the best-known Shakespearean revenge tragedies is Othello and tragic comedy is The Tempest. One of the most prominently occurring and important aspects of human nature that appears in Shakespeare’s work is the concept of revenge. In most of the tragic plays of Shakespeare, the avenger has his thoughts of commit ting revenge and towards the end causes his own downfall andRead MoreTheme Of Cruelty In Othello720 Words   |  3 Pagesmotivation or a major social or political factor. In the play Othello by Shakespeare cruelty functions as a crucial motivation, creating a theme of being careful with who can be trusted because, you never know if they’re telling the whole truth. Throughout the play, diction, dramatic irony, and characterization were used to further emphasis the theme. The characterization of Othello contributes to theme in many different ways. Othello is someone who everyone seemed to trust. â€Å"This only is the witchcraftRead MoreThemes Of William Shakespeare s Othello956 Words   |  4 Pagesdistinguish the work’s theme over all of the other events and symbols appearing within the piece. Examples of motifs include jealousy, love, disloyalty, and hate. By including such motifs within a writing piece, these topics will become more prominent over others in the story and will act to greatly affect the plot and highlight a possible theme. William Shakespeare uses motifs in order to receive this outcome in his drama Othello. In Shakespeare’s drama, motifs such as jealousy, revenge, and ignorance bothRead MoreEssay on The Major Themes in William Shakespeares Othello934 Words   |  4 PagesThe Major Themes in William Shakespeares Othello Irony and double meaning are the basis and patterns of Othello, in which nothing is what it seems to be; white is black and generally the characters and themes have contradictory aspects. Irony is one of the characteristics of tragedy as the outcome, although inevitable, is unfair. In Act 1 scene 1, Shakespeare sets up the main themes of: jealousy, revenge, xenophobia and racism, love, outward appearance and inwardRead MoreIago in Shakespeares Othello Essay1381 Words   |  6 PagesShakespeares Othello is a remarkable tale of trust, deceitfulness, lust and the most destructive of human emotions: vengeance and hatred. Iago better known as Othellos antagonist embodies vengeance and hatred to move an agenda to squash all who oppose Iagos plans. As defined by Merrium-Webster the definition of a protagonist is a principal character in a literary work or a leading actor, character, or participant in a literary work. Othello by Shakespeare is a play about Othello an example ofRead MoreOthello: What You See Is Not What You Get1063 Words   |  5 PagesIllusion versus reality is an easily recognised theme in the play Othello, written by William Shakespeare. Shakespeare effectively combines illusion with reality in the play, Othello. The illusion easily distorts the reality of the characters and their thoughts and actions. These illusions are evident in the main characters of Iago, Michael Ca ssio and Othello. This review will discuss the illusion versus reality that is seen in the play. Illusion being judgements of an individual from what is seenRead MoreTheme Of Monstrous Jealousy In William Shakespeares Othello1271 Words   |  6 PagesWilliam Shakespeare’s â€Å"Othello†, illustrates four of themes in the play. One of the themes is extreme jealousy can make a person act like a monster. In the play, Shakespeare uses Othello, Roderigo, and Iago to prove the theme of Monstrous Jealousy by Othello slapping Desdemona in front of the Public of Venusians calling her cruel names and Developing evil schemes to kill Desdemona at night. Iago tells the lie to Othello about Cassio and Desdemona to and convincing Othello to believe in it. RoderigoRead MoreOthello, The Moor Of Venice, Is One Of The Principal Tragedies1180 Words   |  5 PagesOthello, the Moor of Venice, is one of the principal tragedies by Shakespeare. This tragedy contains many themes which are i mportant in society today. Many aspects of people s lives have changed, but the way people think is still the same . Shakespeare s Othello wants to underline the psychological and social impact of racism; and the power of manipulation as well as jealousy. These are the most important themes throughout this drama. Othello takes place in Venice, Italy. He was a black generalRead MoreWhy Is Shakespeares Othello Still Relevant in Todays Audiences?940 Words   |  4 PagesWhy is Shakespeare’s â€Å"Othello† still relevant in today’s audiences? â€Å"When you begin a journey of revenge, start by digging two graves: one for your enemy, and one for yourself.† – Jodi Picoult. Othello is a very well-known Shakespearian text and is still relevant to today’s audiences. The themes in â€Å"Othello† are still applicable to today’s many audiences; Betrayal is a key theme presented in Othello, and is also still relevantRead MoreThe True Nature of Obsession (Othello, Endless Love and Damoyre)1637 Words   |  7 Pages William Shakespeare manifests this idea of an involuntary change in character in the play â€Å"Othello†, and with a similar approach this idea is identified by Scott Spencer in the novel â€Å"Endless Love† and is further explored in â€Å"Obsession†, a poem written by DaMoyre. Throughout each of these texts, the composers’ use of characterization depicts the true nature of obsession with themes of jealously, revenge and, as a consequence, madness. Amidst the pursuit of an obsession, a person can lose their

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Frostbite Chapter 16 Free Essays

string(99) " Dragomir princess to bring her dhampir friend to this highly anticipated, invitation-only dinner\." Sixteen LISSA FOUND ME LATER IN the day. I’d fallen asleep after Mason left, too dejected to leave the bed. Her slamming of the door jolted me awake. We will write a custom essay sample on Frostbite Chapter 16 or any similar topic only for you Order Now I was happy to see her. I needed to spill about the fumbled thing with Mason, but before I could, I read her feelings. They were as troubled as mine. So, as always, I put her first. â€Å"What happened?† She sat on her bed, sinking into the feather duvet, her feelings both furious and sad. â€Å"Christian.† â€Å"Really?† I’d never known them to fight. They teased each other a lot, but it was hardly the kind of thing that could nearly bring her to tears. â€Å"He found out†¦ I was with Adrian this morning.† â€Å"Oh, wow,† I said. â€Å"Yeah. That might be a problem.† Standing up, I walked over to the dresser and found my brush. Wincing, I stood in front of the gilt-framed mirror and began brushing out the snarls acquired during my nap. She groaned. â€Å"But nothing happened! Christian’s freaking out over nothing. I can’t believe he doesn’t trust me.† â€Å"He trusts you. The whole thing’s just weird, that’s all.† I thought about Dimitri and Tasha. â€Å"Jealousy makes people do and say stupid things.† â€Å"But nothing happened,† she repeated. â€Å"I mean, you were there and- hey, I never found out. What were you doing there?† â€Å"Adrian sent me a bunch of perfume.† â€Å"He- you mean that giant box you were carrying?† I nodded. â€Å"Whoa.† â€Å"Yeah. I came to return it,† I said. â€Å"The question is, what were you doing there?† â€Å"Just talking,† she said. She started to light up, on the verge of telling me something, but then she paused. I felt the thought almost reach the front of her mind and then get shoved back. â€Å"I’ve got a lot to tell you, but first tell me what’s up with you.† â€Å"Nothing’s up with me.† â€Å"Whatever, Rose. I’m not psychic like you, but I know when you’re pissed off about something. You’ve been kind of down since Christmas. What’s up?† Now wasn’t the time to get into what had happened on Christmas when my mom told me about Tasha and Dimitri. But I did tell Lissa the story about Mason- editing out why I had stopped- and simply driving home how I had. â€Å"Well†¦Ã¢â‚¬  she said when I finished. â€Å"That was your right.† â€Å"I know. But I kind of led him on. I can see why he’d be upset.† â€Å"You guys can probably fix it, though. Go talk to him. He’s crazy about you.† It was more than miscommunication. Things with Mason and me couldn’t be patched up so easily. â€Å"I don’t know,† I told her. â€Å"Not everyone’s like you and Christian.† Her face darkened. â€Å"Christian. I still can’t believe he’s being so stupid about this.† I didn’t mean to, but I laughed. â€Å"Liss, you guys’ll kiss and make up in like a day. More than kiss, probably.† It slipped out before I could stop it. Her eyes widened. â€Å"You know.† She shook her head in exasperation. â€Å"Of course you know.† â€Å"Sorry,† I said. I hadn’t meant to let her know I knew about the sex thing, not until she told me herself. She eyed me. â€Å"How much do you know?† â€Å"Um, not much,† I lied. I’d finished brushing my hair but began playing with the brush’s handle in order to avoid her eyes. â€Å"I have got to learn to keep you out of my mind,† she muttered. â€Å"Only way I can ‘talk’ to you lately.† Another slipup. â€Å"What’s that supposed to mean?† she demanded. â€Å"Nothing †¦ I†¦Ã¢â‚¬  She was giving me a sharp look. â€Å"I†¦ I don’t know. I just feel like we don’t talk as much anymore.† â€Å"Takes two to fix that,† she said, voice kind again. â€Å"You’re right,† I said, not pointing out that two could fix that only if one wasn’t always with her boyfriend. True, I was guilty in my own way of locking things up- but I had wanted to talk to her a number of times lately. The timing just never seemed to be right- not even now. â€Å"You know, I never thought you’d be first. Or I guess I never thought I’d be a senior and still be a virgin.† â€Å"Yeah,† she said dryly. â€Å"Me either.† â€Å"Hey! What’s that supposed to mean?† She grinned, then caught sight of her watch. Her smile fell. â€Å"Ugh. I’ve got to go to Priscilla’s banquet. Christian was supposed to go with me, but he’s off being an idiot†¦.† Her eyes focused hopefully on me. â€Å"What? No. Please, Liss. You know how I hate those formal royal things.† â€Å"Oh, come on,† she begged. â€Å"Christian flaked out. You can’t throw me to the wolves. And didn’t you just say we needed to talk more?† I groaned. â€Å"Besides, when you’re my guardian, you’ll have to do these things all the time.† â€Å"I know,† I said darkly. â€Å"I thought I could maybe enjoy my last six months of freedom.† But in the end, she conned me into going with her, as we’d both known she would. We didn’t have much time, and I had to do a rush shower, blow-dry, and makeup job. I’d brought Tasha’s dress on a whim, and while I still wanted her to suffer horribly for being attracted to Dimitri, I was grateful for her present now. I pulled on the silken material, happy to see the shade of red was just as killer on me as I’d imagined. It was a long, Asian-style dress with flowers embroidered into the silk. The high neck and long hem covered a lot of skin, but the material clung to me and looked sexy in a different kind of way than showing a lot of skin did. My black eye was practically nonexistent by now. Lissa, as always, looked amazing. She wore a deep purple dress by Johnna Raski, a well-known Moroi designer. It was sleeveless and made of satin. The tiny amethyst-like crystals set into the straps sparkled against her pale skin. She wore her hair up in a loose, artfully styled bun. When we reached the banquet room, we drew a few eyes. I don’t think the royals had expected the Dragomir princess to bring her dhampir friend to this highly anticipated, invitation-only dinner. You read "Frostbite Chapter 16" in category "Essay examples" But hey, Lissa’s invite had said â€Å"and guest.† She and I took our places at one of the tables with some royals whose names I promptly forgot. They were happy to ignore me, and I was happy to be ignored. Besides, it wasn’t like there weren’t plenty of other distractions. This room was done all in silver and blue. Midnight blue silk cloths covered the tables, so shiny and smooth that I was terrified to eat on them. Sconces of beeswax candles hung all over the walls, and a fireplace decorated with stained glass crackled away in one corner. The effect was a spectacular panorama of color and light, dizzying to the eye. In the corner, a slim Moroi woman played soft cello music, her face dreamy as she focused on the song. The clinking of crystal wineglasses complemented the strings’ low, sweet notes. Dinner was equally amazing. The food was elaborate, but I recognized everything on my plate (china, of course) and liked all of it. No foie gras here. Salmon in a sauce of shiitake mushrooms. A salad with pears and goat cheese. Delicate almond-stuffed pastries for dessert. My only complaint was that the portions were small. The food seemed more like it was there to simply decorate the plates, and I swear, I finished it in ten bites. Moroi might still need food along with their blood, but they didn’t need as much as a human- or, say, a growing dhampir girl- needed. Still, the food alone could have justified me coming along on this venture, I decided. Except, when the meal ended, Lissa told me we couldn’t leave. â€Å"We have to mingle,† she whispered. Mingle? Lissa laughed at my discomfort. â€Å"You’re the social one.† It was true. In most circumstances, I was the one who put myself out there and wasn’t afraid to talk to people. Lissa tended to be shyer. Only, with this group, the tables were turned. This was her element, not mine, and it amazed me to see just how well she could interact with royal high society now. She was perfect, polished and polite. Everyone was eager to talk to her, and she always seemed to know the right thing to say. She wasn’t using compulsion, exactly, but she definitely put out an air that drew others to her. I think it might have been an unconscious effect of spirit. Even with the meds, her magical and natural charisma came through. Whereas intense social interactions had once been forced and stressful for her, she now conducted them with ease. I was proud of her. Most of the conversation stayed pretty light: fashion, royal love lives, etc. No one seemed to want to spoil the atmosphere with ugly Strigoi talk. So I clung to her side for the rest of the night. I tried to tell myself it was just practice for the future, when I’d follow her around like a quiet shadow anyway. The truth was, I just felt too uncomfortable with this group and knew my usual snarky defense mechanisms really weren’t useful here. Plus, I was painfully aware that I was the only dhampir dinner guest. There were other dhampirs, yes, but they were in formal guardian mode, hovering on the periphery of the room. As Lissa worked the crowd, we drifted over to a small group of Moroi whose voices were growing louder. One of them I recognized. He was the guy from the fight that I’d helped break up, only this time he wore a striking black tuxedo instead of a swimsuit. He glanced up at our approach, blatantly checked us out, but apparently didn’t remember me. Ignoring us, he continued on with his argument. Not surprisingly, Moroi protection was the topic. He was the one who’d been in favor of Moroi going on the offensive against the Strigoi. â€Å"What part of ‘suicide’ don’t you understand?† asked one of the men standing nearby. He had silvery hair and a bushy mustache. He wore a tux too, but the younger guy looked better in one. â€Å"Moroi training as soldiers will be the end of our race.† â€Å"It’s not suicide,† exclaimed the young guy. â€Å"It’s the right thing to do. We have to start looking out for ourselves. Learning to fight and use our magic is our greatest asset, other than the guardians.† â€Å"Yes, but with the guardians, we don’t need other assets,† said Silver Hair. â€Å"You’ve been listening to non-royals. They don’t have any guardians of their own, so of course they’re scared. But that’s no reason to drag us down and put our lives at risk.† â€Å"Then don’t,† said Lissa suddenly. Her voice was soft, but everyone in the little group stopped and looked at her. â€Å"When you talk about Moroi learning how to fight, you make it sound like an all-or-nothing matter. It’s not. If you don’t want to fight, then you shouldn’t have to. I completely understand.† The man looked slightly mollified. â€Å"But, that’s because you can rely on your guardians. A lot of Moroi can’t. And if they want to learn self-defense, there’s no reason why they shouldn’t do it on their own.† The younger guy grinned triumphantly at his adversary. â€Å"There, you see?† â€Å"It’s not that easy,† countered Silver Hair. â€Å"If it was just a matter of you crazy people wanting to get yourselves killed, then fine. Go do it. But where are you going to learn all these so-called fighting skills?† â€Å"We’ll figure the magic out on our own. Guardians will teach us actual physical fighting.† â€Å"Yes, see? I knew that was where this was going. Even if the rest of us don’t take part in your suicide mission, you still want to strip us of our guardians to train up your pretend army.† The young guy scowled at the word pretend, and I wondered if more fists would fly. â€Å"You owe it to us.† â€Å"No, they don’t,† said Lissa. Intrigued gazes turned her way again. This time, it was Silver Hair who regarded her triumphantly. The younger guy’s features flushed with anger. â€Å"Guardians are the best battle resources we have.† â€Å"They are,† she agreed, â€Å"but that doesn’t give you the right to take them away from their duty.† Silver Hair practically glowed. â€Å"Then how are we supposed to learn?† demanded the other guy. â€Å"The same way guardians do,† Lissa informed him. â€Å"If you want to learn to fight, go to the academies. Form classes and start at the beginning, the same way the novices do. That way, you won’t be taking guardians away from active protection. It’s a safe environment, and the guardians there specialize in teaching students anyway.† She paused thoughtfully. â€Å"You could even start making defense part of the standard curriculum for Moroi students already there.† Astonished stares fell on her, mine included. It was such an elegant solution, and everyone else around us realized it. It gave no party 100 percent of its demands, but it met most in a way that didn’t really harm the other side. Pure genius. The other Moroi studied her with wonder and fascination. Suddenly, everyone started talking at once, excited about the idea. They drew Lissa in, and soon there was a passionate conversation going on about her plan. I got shuffled to the edges and decided that was just fine. Then I retreated altogether and sought out a corner near a door. Along the way, I passed a server with a tray of hors d’oeuvres. Still hungry, I eyed them suspiciously but saw nothing that looked like the foie gras from the other day. I gestured to one that looked like some sort of braised, rare meat. â€Å"Is that goose liver?† I asked. She shook her head. â€Å"Sweetbread.† That didn’t sound bad. I reached for it. â€Å"It’s pancreas,† said a voice behind me. I jerked back. â€Å"What?† I squeaked. The waitress took my shock for rejection and moved on. Adrian Ivashkov moved into my line of sight, looking immensely pleased with himself. â€Å"Are you messing with me?† I asked. â€Å"‘Sweetbread’ is pancreas?† I don’t know why that shocked me so much. Moroi consumed blood. Why not internal organs? Still, I repressed a shudder. Adrian shrugged. â€Å"It’s really good.† I shook my head in disgust. â€Å"Oh, man. Rich people suck.† His amusement continued. â€Å"What are you doing here, little dhampir? Are you following me around?† â€Å"Of course not,† I scoffed. He was dressed to perfection, as always. â€Å"Especially not after all the trouble you’ve gotten us into.† He flashed one of his tantalizing smiles, and despite how much he annoyed me, I again felt that overwhelming urge to be near him. What was up with that? â€Å"I don’t know,† he teased. He looked perfectly sane now, exhibiting no trace of the weird behavior I’d witnessed in his room. And yeah, he looked a lot better in a tuxedo than any guy I’d seen in there so far. â€Å"As many times as we keep seeing each other? This is, what, the fifth time? It’s starting to look suspicious. Don’t worry, though. I won’t tell your boyfriend. Either of them.† I opened my mouth to protest, then remembered he’d seen me with Dimitri earlier. I refused to blush. â€Å"I only have one boyfriend. Sort of. Maybe not anymore. And anyway, there’s nothing to tell. I don’t even like you.† â€Å"No?† asked Adrian, still smiling. He leaned toward me, like he had a secret to share. â€Å"Then why are you wearing my perfume?† This time, I did blush. I took a step back. â€Å"I’m not.† He laughed. â€Å"Of course you are. I counted the boxes after you left. Besides, I can smell it on you. It’s nice. Sharp†¦but still sweet- just like I’m sure you are deep down inside. And you got it right, you know. Just enough to add an edge†¦but not enough to drown your own scent.† The way he said â€Å"scent† made it sound like a dirty word. Royal Moroi might make me uncomfortable, but smartass guys hitting on me didn’t. I dealt with them on a regular basis. I shook off my shyness and remembered who I was. â€Å"Hey,† I said, tossing my hair back. â€Å"I had every right to take one. You offered them. Your mistake is in assuming me taking one means anything. It doesn’t. Except that maybe you should be more careful with where you dump all that money of yours.† â€Å"Ooh, Rose Hathaway is here to play, folks.† He paused and took a glass of what looked like champagne from a passing waiter. â€Å"You want one?† â€Å"I don’t drink.† â€Å"Right.† Adrian handed me a glass anyway, then shooed the waiter away and took a drink of the champagne. I had a feeling it wasn’t his first of the night. â€Å"So. Sounds like our Vasilisa put my dad in his place.† â€Å"Your †¦Ã¢â‚¬  I glanced back at the group I’d just left. Silver Hair still stood there, gesticulating wildly. â€Å"That guy’s your dad?† â€Å"That’s what my mom says.† â€Å"You agree with him? About how Moroi fighting would be suicide?† Adrian shrugged and took another sip. â€Å"I don’t really have an opinion on that.† â€Å"That’s not possible. How can you not feel one way or another?† â€Å"Dunno. Just not something I think about. I’ve got better things to do.† â€Å"Like stalk me,† I suggested. â€Å"And Lissa.† I still wanted to know why she’d been in his room. He smiled again. â€Å"I told you, you’re the one following me.† â€Å"Yeah, yeah, I know. Five times- † I stopped. â€Å"Five times?† He nodded. â€Å"No, it’s only been four.† With my free hand, I ticked them off. â€Å"There was that first night, the night at the spa, then when I came to your room, and now tonight.† The smile turned secretive. â€Å"If you say so.† â€Å"I do say so†¦Ã¢â‚¬  Again, my words trailed off. I had talked to Adrian one other time. Sort of. â€Å"You can’t mean †¦Ã¢â‚¬  â€Å"Mean what?† A curious, eager expression lit his eyes. It was more hopeful than presumptuous. I swallowed, recalling the dream. â€Å"Nothing.† Without thinking about it, I took a drink of champagne. Across the room, Lissa’s feelings burned back to me, calm and content. Good. â€Å"Why are you smiling?† Adrian asked. â€Å"Because Lissa’s still over there, working that crowd.† â€Å"No surprise there. She’s one of those people who can charm anyone she wants if she tries hard enough. Even people who hate her.† I gave him a wry look. â€Å"I feel that way when I talk to you.† â€Å"But you don’t hate me,† he said, finishing the last of his champagne. â€Å"Not really.† â€Å"I don’t like you either.† â€Å"So you keep saying.† He took a step toward me, not threatening, just making the space between us more intimate. â€Å"But I can live with that.† â€Å"Rose!† The sharpness of my mother’s voice cut through the air. A few people within earshot glanced over at us. My mother- all five angry feet of her- stormed up to us. How to cite Frostbite Chapter 16, Essay examples

Saturday, May 2, 2020

Governments Regulate Natural Monopolies †Myassignmenthelp.Com

Question: Why And How Governments Regulate Natural Monopolies? Answer: Introducation Today, natural monopolies are one of the oldest varieties of the free market economy throughout the world. In Australia, natural monopolies play a significant role in the economy. Mainly, this form of market structure arises due to high fixed and initial costs of setting up and operating in a particular industry (Welker, n.d.). Also, they may arise due to constraints brought about by control over raw materials and technological factors in a given industry. Thus, companies explore the high barriers to entry to create a defensive wall that keeps off competition (Arkani, 2010). Consequently, it blocks potential competition in the market, and acts as the sole seller of a given product. Thus, firms have the power to determine the quantity of a product that is produced and the prices charged for that product (Monopoly, n.d.). In most cases, monopolies limit their production to raise the prices of their goods and services. In this regard, governments regulate natural monopolies in order to protect consumers from exorbitant monopoly prices. Reasons for Regulation Maintain low prices One of the major reasons why governments regulate natural monopolies is to ensure that they maintain low prices. As noted earlier, the monopoly market structure permits firms to set the quantity and price for the goods they produce. As a result, producers have the power to raise their prices higher than they could of they were operating under competitive market structures (Pettinger, 2012). In a perfect competitive structure, prices are determined by forces of supply and demand in the market. Thus, the prices are always at equilibrium. However, in a monopoly market structure, firms manufacture goods at the point where the MR equals their MC, but charge the price determined by the demand curve. In turn, they make supernormal profits at the expense of consumers welfare. Monopoly pricing Source: (Pettinger, 2012) From the graph above, one notes that the prices charged by a natural monopoly is higher than the average total cost incurred in the production of the product. In turn, this results in deadweight loss, thereby leading to a reduction in consumers welfare (Pettinger, n.d.). For this reason, the government steps in and initiates measures that aim at reducing the price level that such firms charge their consumers. Improve efficiency The government also instills measures to regulate monopolies with the aim of improving their level of efficiency. More precisely, the lack of competition in this market may cause firms to be unproductive and wasteful as they are the only firms that can produce a particular product. Often, they have little incentive to improve the quality of the goods and services that they produce. Therefore, the government steps in by creating minimum standards of service and quality of products that the firm must meet. How Governments Regulate Natural Monopolies The government instigates regulatory measures on natural monopolies in various forms. In most cases, the regulation takes the form of price capping, regulation of the quality of service, rate of return policies, and average cost pricing systems, among others. Price Ceiling Notably, price capping is one of the most efficient methods used by the government to regulate the price charged by monopolies for their goods and services. Fundamentally, a price ceiling is where the government sets a maximum price that firms can charge for a particular product. In this case, firms cannot charge a price higher than the designated price. In turn, this helps in regulating the amount that monopolies can charge for their products. Indeed, this way, monopolies are unable to raise their prices, thereby leading to the protection of the welfare of consumers of that product. According to the figure below, the firm would charge consumers a price of Pm if its prices are not regulated. However, when the government sets the price ceiling at the point Pr, the firm is forced to reduce the price it charges to the one set by the government. In this case, the government spares the consumer Pm-Pr that they would have used on buying one unit of the commodity at the monopoly price. It also reduces the deadweight loss associated with monopolies, thereby increasing welfare of consumers. Regulation through creation of a Price Ceiling Source: (Osborne, 1997). Average Cost Pricing The government may also set a policy that requires a monopoly to set its prices equal to the overall costs incurred in producing a particular product. In this case, the price set by the firm is limited to the average costs incurred during the production of the good. Consequently, this reduces the pricing flexibility of a company by ensuring that it cannot obtain supernormal profit margins. Rate of Return Regulation In the same way, the government may use the rate of return on capital invested to regulate monopolies. In this policy, the rate of return on investment is capped and, thus, forces firms to reduce the prices they charge for their commodities. Primarily, the percentage net profit that a firm obtains must be below the amount specified by the government to ensure compliance with the regulation. Primarily, the government considers the size of the monopoly and determines a reasonable level of profit from the capital base. Thus, if the firm is making supernormal profits when compared to its size, it is forced to enforce price reductions on its services and goods. As a result, this protects consumers welfare by ensuring the firm sets optimal prices. Regulatory Bodies Another way for regulating monopolies may involve the creation of regulatory bodies that monitor and control the conduct of natural monopolies. Fundamentally, the regulatory bodies are formed to examine the quality of services and products that are produced by the monopolies and compare them with the predetermined standards (Pettinger, n.d.). They also monitor the prices charged by monopolies for their commodities to ensure that they do not exploit their clients. Furthermore, regulatory bodies investigate claims when it is suspected that monopolies are practicing market segmentation, price fixations, and predatory pricing, and take action against offenders. Consequently, it is worth noting that the setting up of regulatory bodies significantly reduces the incidence of exorbitant pricing by monopolies as well as ensures the production of high quality goods by natural monopolies. Indeed, this mechanism guarantees consumer protection and efficiency of firms. Example In Australia, the government has put in place various regulatory bodies (The Conversation, 2012). For instance, the energy regulatory body is charged with the responsibility of regulating the prices of electricity in the country. In the same way, Office of Rail Regulation, in Australia is the economic and independent safety regulator of the railway monopoly in Britain while OFGEM is charged with the responsibility of overseeing and regulating the gas and electricity market. All in all, all factors taken into consideration, it is important for the government to regulate monopolies in the country. Usually, natural monopolies take advantage of the fact that there is limited competition in their market structure. As a result, they charge high prices for their goods and services. On other occasions, monopolies offer poor quality commodities since they do face any form of competition. What is more, the lack of competition in the market reduces the incentives of monopolies to produce efficiently. For this reason, governments initiate regulatory policies to ensure the capping of prices charged by monopolies, ensure production of high quality products and improve their efficiency. Mainly, this is achieved through the setting of price caps in the form of price ceiling, average cost pricing policies, and rate of return regulations. In addition, the government may establish regulatory bodies to monitor the operations of natural monopolies. In turn, the implementati on of these measures ensures the safeguarding of consumer welfare through reasonable prices and high quality products. References Arkani, G. (2010). Monopoly marketing structure- meaning, features and types. Kaylan City Life. Retrieved on 28 Aug 2017, from https://kalyan-city.blogspot.co.ke/2010/11/monopoly-market-structure-meaning.html Deregulation is crucial for lowering Australias electricity costs (2012). The Conversation. Retrieved on 28 Aug 2017, from https://theconversation.com/deregulation-is-crucial-for-lowering-australias-electricity-costs-10625 Monopoly (2012). Economics Online. Retrieved on 28 Aug 2017, from https://www.economicsonline.co.uk/Business_economics/Monopoly.html Orsborne, J. M. (1997). Policies to control a monopoly. University of Toronto. Retrieved on 28 Aug 2017, from https://www.economics.utoronto.ca/osborne/2x3/tutorial/MONCON.HTM Pettinger, T. (2012). Natural Monopoly. Economics Help. Retrieved on 28 Aug 2017, from https://www.economicshelp.org/blog/glossary/natural-monopoly/ Pettinger, T. Regulation of monopoly.Economics Help. Retrieved on 28 Aug 2017, from https://www.economicshelp.org/microessays/markets/regulation-monopoly/ Welker, J. Natural Monopoly and the need for Government Regulation. Economics Classroom. Retrieved on 28 Aug 2017, from https://econclassroom.com/?p=3115

Sunday, March 22, 2020

The Human Sciences Essay Example

The Human Sciences Essay Human behavior makes most sense when it is explained in terms of beliefs and desires, not in terms of volts and grams (Steven Pinker, 1954-). As Pinker correctly said, humans are characterized by their beliefs and opinions. Many people say that they try to and succeed in maintaining an unprejudiced outlook on daily life. However, in the attempt of being unbiased with their beliefs and conclusions, all humans fail dismally. All things that reside in a persons mind are subjective, and thus loaded with belief. According to the Oxford School Dictionary, a belief is a view or judgment of something not necessarily based on fact or knowledge, and a bias is prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person or group compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair. If we accept these definitions to be true, then it concludes that it is impossible to have a belief that is unbiased. If one believes something, one has made a judgment of that thing, and thus is biased by that judgment. A belief is, by its very definition, a bias. A person may not have a specific bias for or against an issue, but he or she does have several previously formed beliefs that will lead to the formation of an opinion on that issue. Human scientists are no different. Frequently, while searching for trends in and attempting to define human behavior, scientists draw conclusions that are almost unknowingly laden with biased beliefs. In my opinion, every person, including human scientists, has fallen prey to the confirmation bias, the belief bias, and the prison of consistency while drawing a conclusion that he/she wishes to pass as a knowledge claim. We will write a custom essay sample on The Human Sciences specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on The Human Sciences specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on The Human Sciences specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer In short, the beliefs of human scientists greatly influence their conclusions. The confirmation bias is the most frequently criticized aspect of human scientists conclusions. People are inclined to believe that the human sciences are more prone to bias (due to being less scientific than their natural science counterparts). Firstly, just like any other humans, human scientists are prone to commence their search for a conclusion about humankind with prejudices and biases about individuals and societies natures. People are more likely to think more highly of a branch of society that they are part of. For this reason, human scientists generally find it difficult to be open minded about contentious topics such as racial and gender differences. Secondly, due to the fact that the human sciences deal with individuals, and people are more likely to form emotional attachments with people, rather than math theorems and atom nuclei, over-identification with humans that a scientist is supposed to be analyzing is almost unavoidable. Just like Bruce Parry had to struggle to remain completely objective while on his stay with the Kombai tribe, human scientists struggle to remain free of previous belief and bias while drawing conclusions about humankind. All scientists, especially human scientists, are prone to being affected by bias and emotion when trying to use reason to conclude a general trend in humankinds behavior. For this reason, there exist all kinds of controversies and disagreements in human science. While trying to draw a conclusion, the confirmation bias leads to scientists only recognizing evidence that contributes to their conclusion. They only notice confirming evidence like such because they are biased to believe that their conclusion is true and they somehow have to prove it to be so. Perhaps the only solution to such confirmation biases is actively pursuing contradictory evidence, and analyzing and acknowledging criticisms that seek to discredit their biased research and conclusions.

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Free Essays on A Nervous Splendor

Unit 5 Historical Interpretation Question 1 A Nervous Splendor by Fredric Morton A Nervous Splendor is a study of a single year - 1888-1889 - in the fairy tale city of Vienna. During this year Johann Strauss Jr. wrote his Emperor Waltz; Sigmund Freud, having quit his lucrative job as assistant physician to a Nerve Specialist for the Very Rich, used the term "subconscious" for the first time in print; there was a renaissance of Viennese music, art, literature, and architecture; and Vienna became the Suicide Capital of the world. It was the year Crown Prince Rudolph, handsome and popular heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, shot his 17 year-old mistress Mary Vetsera and then himself at his hunting lodge Mayerling. It was also the year Clara Hitler gave birth to Adolph. For many Austrians, it was the year the Western Dream died. In Vienna, the Totentanz, the 'Dance of Death', is necessarily a waltz. Frederic Morton, Viennese to the core and one of our better novelists, turned his hand a decade back to history, the history of Vienna before the wars. The results are s uperb. In A Nervous Splendor, Morton takes up the life and mood of an ancient and imperial city confronting the quickening of modernity: much of the modern world was borne in the Habsburg womb, incongruously enough. Herzl and Freud, Klimt and Mahler, street-sweepers and archdukes all play their parts, drawn in telling detail, richly nuanced. A Nervous Splendor details an ominous year in the failing life of the Austro-Hungarian Dyarchy: a year of suicides great and obscure, of intellectual rebellions and repressions, a year in which Bruckner and Brahms reconciled, Freud took the first steps into a new discipline, and Arthur Schnitzler faced the facts of the writing life. A year dark with portent, and centering most darkly upon the figure of the imperial heir apparent. A year in the gimcrack capital of a ramshackle empire, whose armies moved (usually in retreat) in three... Free Essays on A Nervous Splendor Free Essays on A Nervous Splendor Unit 5 Historical Interpretation Question 1 A Nervous Splendor by Fredric Morton A Nervous Splendor is a study of a single year - 1888-1889 - in the fairy tale city of Vienna. During this year Johann Strauss Jr. wrote his Emperor Waltz; Sigmund Freud, having quit his lucrative job as assistant physician to a Nerve Specialist for the Very Rich, used the term "subconscious" for the first time in print; there was a renaissance of Viennese music, art, literature, and architecture; and Vienna became the Suicide Capital of the world. It was the year Crown Prince Rudolph, handsome and popular heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, shot his 17 year-old mistress Mary Vetsera and then himself at his hunting lodge Mayerling. It was also the year Clara Hitler gave birth to Adolph. For many Austrians, it was the year the Western Dream died. In Vienna, the Totentanz, the 'Dance of Death', is necessarily a waltz. Frederic Morton, Viennese to the core and one of our better novelists, turned his hand a decade back to history, the history of Vienna before the wars. The results are s uperb. In A Nervous Splendor, Morton takes up the life and mood of an ancient and imperial city confronting the quickening of modernity: much of the modern world was borne in the Habsburg womb, incongruously enough. Herzl and Freud, Klimt and Mahler, street-sweepers and archdukes all play their parts, drawn in telling detail, richly nuanced. A Nervous Splendor details an ominous year in the failing life of the Austro-Hungarian Dyarchy: a year of suicides great and obscure, of intellectual rebellions and repressions, a year in which Bruckner and Brahms reconciled, Freud took the first steps into a new discipline, and Arthur Schnitzler faced the facts of the writing life. A year dark with portent, and centering most darkly upon the figure of the imperial heir apparent. A year in the gimcrack capital of a ramshackle empire, whose armies moved (usually in retreat) in three...

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Macroeconomics Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words - 1

Macroeconomics - Assignment Example The main difference between GDP and GNP is that GDP measures total income in a nation, while GNP measures total income by a nation’s residents. GDP is the more widely relied upon statistic by business, policy makers and the public. The change in GDP is used to calculate whether a nation’s economy is expanding or contracting. As the broadest measure of a nation’s economic activity it indicates the overall health in the economy. As the broadest measure it is heavily relied upon by business and policy makers to plan as well set monetary and fiscal policy. While the general public may not use GDP because of the effects of GDP on business and policy officials they are impacted as well. For business leaders the main use of GDP is in planning and investment. One way business leaders can use GDP and GNP in combination is to determine where revenue is being earned. By comparing GDP to GNP they can determine whether there is growth in income is coming from domestic or foreign sources. GDP and GNP are also traditionally used in business cycle forecasting. By looking at the trends and changes in GDP it can allow businesses to plan for turns in the business cycle rather than simply reacting. These decisions have an impact upon the general public in the form of job creation or cut backs by businesses. For policy makers GDP is a signal used in creating monetary and fiscal policy as well as measuring its effectiveness. If the economy is growing too quickly policy makers can apply contractionary policy such as raising interest rates and taxes to cool the economy. If the economy is contracting they can then use expansionary policy, such as low interest rates, tax reductions and government investment to boost the economy. Government expenditures are of particular importance as they are directly taken into account in GDP. By increasing expenditures the government can turn a recession into an expansion single handedly. This